WHAT'S ON YOUR TOOTHBRUSH?


As clean and new as your toothbrush might look, it is never what it seems. This is why the American Dental Association recommends that you change your toothbrush every 3 months, and not based upon looks. Toothbrushes are highly prone to bacteria settlement and also lose their mechanical effectiveness over time. Find out here why you should change your toothbrush at least every 3 months, in detail.

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) also recommends to replace your toothbrush every 3 months, or sooner if the bristles appear worn or splayed. 
HERE IS A CLOSE-UP LOOK AT A TOOTHBRUSH BRISTLE
(Under Microscope)
TYPE OF BACTERIA FOUND ON A TOOTHBRUSH
(Under Microscope)

​Various studies, including that of researchers at the University of Manchester in England have revealed micro-organisms to be present in the toothbrush head between the bristle tufts. Another study shows that micro-organisms were found in isolated form and were less in number in a 1 month used toothbrush, whereas they were in clumps and more in number in toothbrushes that has been used for 3 months.

​Here are a few of these bacteria:
  • STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS
    (Causes tooth decay)
  • E-COLI
    (Causes kidney failure, anemia,
    urinary tract infections, ...)
  • CANDIDA
    (The fungus of yeast infections)
  • STAPHYLOCOCCUS
    (A flesh-eating bacteria)
Pictures Wikimedia / Public Domain